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CORSIA’s ambitious plan
CORSIA’s ambitious plan to reduce aviation emissions globally, projects around the world converting waste to jet fuel, the problem of people trafficking at airports, opening up the final unexplored destinations to travelers, and more.

In this issue: CORSIA’s ambitious plan to reduce aviation emissions globally, projects around the world converting waste to jet fuel, the problem of people trafficking at airports, opening up the final unexplored destinations to travelers, and more.

 

The adoption of CORSIA, a plan to reduce emissions globally based on an agreed set of goals, is the first by any industry and a major coup for the aviation industry, as it looks to avoid a complex of patchwork rules en route to achieving the target of carbon neutral growth. We investigate the plan ahead of its 2020 deadline.

We also take a closer look at landlocked countries where trade and travel is overwhelmingly done by air transport, find out more about two pilot waste to fuel projects, one of which is led by Velocys, which is working with the UK Government to build a plant that converts rubbish into fuel, and report on the problem of human trafficking at airports and the measures needed to eradicate it.

Finally, we consider the thorny issue of passenger blacklisting and whether any one body can be judged independent enough to vet passengers on national or international routes, and examine the remaining unserved air routes after extensive route expansion in the past decade has left few unexplored destinations remaining on the market.

In this issue

Countdown to CORSIA
CORSIA, a global market-based measure under which airlines will monitor and offset their carbon emissions, is a major coup for the aviation industry. But what are the benefits of the scheme and what challenges remain? Joe Baker finds out.
 

Relying on Aviation
Landlocked countries and small island states have something in common when it comes to trade and travel – it almost all comes and goes by air. Eva Grey finds out how these countries use aviation to develop their economies and connect with the rest of the world.
 

Waste to Jet Fuel
The aviation sector has shown an increasing interest in renewable fuels in light of a new drive from the industry. Joe Baker finds out more about a new plant that will convert household waste into a sustainable fuel.
 

Final Approach
Recognising the key role they play in the growing problem of human trafficking, air industry associations have come together to help better train staff in identifying and reporting incidents of smuggling, as Eva Grey finds out.
 

No Fly Lists
Trafficking of goods and people by air creates victims the world over. Could blacklisting of convicted traffickers from international air travel be an effective countermeasure, or simply a step too far? Chris Lo investigates.
 

Untapped Potential
The launch in October of the first weekly service from Aer Lingus between Dublin and Miami highlights a new-found spirit of carriers to fulfil the potential of presently unserved routes. Ross Davies reports.
 

Next issue preview

Dubai Airport is planning to replace its traditional security system with enclosed corridors and virtual fish swimming along the walls. There is method to the madness; the fish are designed to attract passengers’ attention as they walk through the airport, so that 80 cameras can capture their biometric information. We take a closer look at this security concept.

We also profile Doncaster Sheffield Airport as it looks to double passenger numbers, find out how airports are being incorporated as essential elements of modern cities, and explore the best airport art of 2017.

Finally, we consider the role that differences in language between air traffic control and aircraft have played in air accidents, and find out more about the Baidu Maps app, which has recently been launched at Australia’s Sydney Airport.

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